Arts and Robots.
Garden full of inspiration and some random stuff. I want to share artwork of artists around the Internet and create a tumblr where people can look at for ideas and have fun. Most of my post doesn't belong to me and I will give credit for it.
Arts and Robots.
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sekigan:

TOY-RBT-1152_08.jpg
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bento-butt:

「夜の水族館」Original ▼ // Edit: ▲
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cymphony:

drawing process gif…please work ><; Original image 
dA for full sized gif
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plasmatics-life:

Atlantic Ocean by Dara Pilyugina | (Website)
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jump-gate:

Five Star Stories
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sekigan:

Section Z by stuter on deviantART
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sekigan:

Rusted Souls - Gaby by stuter on deviantART
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ani-plamo:

macks-mechas:

Next review is Age of Extinction Deluxe Dinobot Scorn. This is probably one of the best deluxe figures available at the minute. There is very little fault to be found with it and it has an incredible amount of detail.
Firstly, something not mentioned in the instructions, the gunmetal / red side panels on the lower legs can expand outwards to give him thicker robot mode legs. It makes him look meaner and less skimpy.
The paint is applied nicely throughout the figure. The gunmetal, silver, orange and blue all work with the red and grey plastic well to make it look excellent. The figure is very good with poseability both in its Dinobot mode and robot mode, thus far it is the best of all the deluxe AOE figures I own.
The bad now; the neck joint is hindered by two tiny nibs on the back of the head. Unless you position it just right he is either looking straight up or straight down. I’m going to cut them away myself. Secondly this figure relies on rubber pieces for the spines. The tail is a much sturdier rubber that has no issues whatsoever, but the spines feel like they might tear if you aren’t careful with them.
Those aside this is one of the best AOE deluxe figures out there. I highly reccomend it, 9/10 score.

agreed probably one of the best you will get of the AOE
I would also recommend Slug and Galvatron
ani-plamo:

macks-mechas:

Next review is Age of Extinction Deluxe Dinobot Scorn. This is probably one of the best deluxe figures available at the minute. There is very little fault to be found with it and it has an incredible amount of detail.
Firstly, something not mentioned in the instructions, the gunmetal / red side panels on the lower legs can expand outwards to give him thicker robot mode legs. It makes him look meaner and less skimpy.
The paint is applied nicely throughout the figure. The gunmetal, silver, orange and blue all work with the red and grey plastic well to make it look excellent. The figure is very good with poseability both in its Dinobot mode and robot mode, thus far it is the best of all the deluxe AOE figures I own.
The bad now; the neck joint is hindered by two tiny nibs on the back of the head. Unless you position it just right he is either looking straight up or straight down. I’m going to cut them away myself. Secondly this figure relies on rubber pieces for the spines. The tail is a much sturdier rubber that has no issues whatsoever, but the spines feel like they might tear if you aren’t careful with them.
Those aside this is one of the best AOE deluxe figures out there. I highly reccomend it, 9/10 score.

agreed probably one of the best you will get of the AOE
I would also recommend Slug and Galvatron
ani-plamo:

macks-mechas:

Next review is Age of Extinction Deluxe Dinobot Scorn. This is probably one of the best deluxe figures available at the minute. There is very little fault to be found with it and it has an incredible amount of detail.
Firstly, something not mentioned in the instructions, the gunmetal / red side panels on the lower legs can expand outwards to give him thicker robot mode legs. It makes him look meaner and less skimpy.
The paint is applied nicely throughout the figure. The gunmetal, silver, orange and blue all work with the red and grey plastic well to make it look excellent. The figure is very good with poseability both in its Dinobot mode and robot mode, thus far it is the best of all the deluxe AOE figures I own.
The bad now; the neck joint is hindered by two tiny nibs on the back of the head. Unless you position it just right he is either looking straight up or straight down. I’m going to cut them away myself. Secondly this figure relies on rubber pieces for the spines. The tail is a much sturdier rubber that has no issues whatsoever, but the spines feel like they might tear if you aren’t careful with them.
Those aside this is one of the best AOE deluxe figures out there. I highly reccomend it, 9/10 score.

agreed probably one of the best you will get of the AOE
I would also recommend Slug and Galvatron
ani-plamo:

macks-mechas:

Next review is Age of Extinction Deluxe Dinobot Scorn. This is probably one of the best deluxe figures available at the minute. There is very little fault to be found with it and it has an incredible amount of detail.
Firstly, something not mentioned in the instructions, the gunmetal / red side panels on the lower legs can expand outwards to give him thicker robot mode legs. It makes him look meaner and less skimpy.
The paint is applied nicely throughout the figure. The gunmetal, silver, orange and blue all work with the red and grey plastic well to make it look excellent. The figure is very good with poseability both in its Dinobot mode and robot mode, thus far it is the best of all the deluxe AOE figures I own.
The bad now; the neck joint is hindered by two tiny nibs on the back of the head. Unless you position it just right he is either looking straight up or straight down. I’m going to cut them away myself. Secondly this figure relies on rubber pieces for the spines. The tail is a much sturdier rubber that has no issues whatsoever, but the spines feel like they might tear if you aren’t careful with them.
Those aside this is one of the best AOE deluxe figures out there. I highly reccomend it, 9/10 score.

agreed probably one of the best you will get of the AOE
I would also recommend Slug and Galvatron
ani-plamo:

macks-mechas:

Next review is Age of Extinction Deluxe Dinobot Scorn. This is probably one of the best deluxe figures available at the minute. There is very little fault to be found with it and it has an incredible amount of detail.
Firstly, something not mentioned in the instructions, the gunmetal / red side panels on the lower legs can expand outwards to give him thicker robot mode legs. It makes him look meaner and less skimpy.
The paint is applied nicely throughout the figure. The gunmetal, silver, orange and blue all work with the red and grey plastic well to make it look excellent. The figure is very good with poseability both in its Dinobot mode and robot mode, thus far it is the best of all the deluxe AOE figures I own.
The bad now; the neck joint is hindered by two tiny nibs on the back of the head. Unless you position it just right he is either looking straight up or straight down. I’m going to cut them away myself. Secondly this figure relies on rubber pieces for the spines. The tail is a much sturdier rubber that has no issues whatsoever, but the spines feel like they might tear if you aren’t careful with them.
Those aside this is one of the best AOE deluxe figures out there. I highly reccomend it, 9/10 score.

agreed probably one of the best you will get of the AOE
I would also recommend Slug and Galvatron
ani-plamo:

macks-mechas:

Next review is Age of Extinction Deluxe Dinobot Scorn. This is probably one of the best deluxe figures available at the minute. There is very little fault to be found with it and it has an incredible amount of detail.
Firstly, something not mentioned in the instructions, the gunmetal / red side panels on the lower legs can expand outwards to give him thicker robot mode legs. It makes him look meaner and less skimpy.
The paint is applied nicely throughout the figure. The gunmetal, silver, orange and blue all work with the red and grey plastic well to make it look excellent. The figure is very good with poseability both in its Dinobot mode and robot mode, thus far it is the best of all the deluxe AOE figures I own.
The bad now; the neck joint is hindered by two tiny nibs on the back of the head. Unless you position it just right he is either looking straight up or straight down. I’m going to cut them away myself. Secondly this figure relies on rubber pieces for the spines. The tail is a much sturdier rubber that has no issues whatsoever, but the spines feel like they might tear if you aren’t careful with them.
Those aside this is one of the best AOE deluxe figures out there. I highly reccomend it, 9/10 score.

agreed probably one of the best you will get of the AOE
I would also recommend Slug and Galvatron
ani-plamo:

macks-mechas:

Next review is Age of Extinction Deluxe Dinobot Scorn. This is probably one of the best deluxe figures available at the minute. There is very little fault to be found with it and it has an incredible amount of detail.
Firstly, something not mentioned in the instructions, the gunmetal / red side panels on the lower legs can expand outwards to give him thicker robot mode legs. It makes him look meaner and less skimpy.
The paint is applied nicely throughout the figure. The gunmetal, silver, orange and blue all work with the red and grey plastic well to make it look excellent. The figure is very good with poseability both in its Dinobot mode and robot mode, thus far it is the best of all the deluxe AOE figures I own.
The bad now; the neck joint is hindered by two tiny nibs on the back of the head. Unless you position it just right he is either looking straight up or straight down. I’m going to cut them away myself. Secondly this figure relies on rubber pieces for the spines. The tail is a much sturdier rubber that has no issues whatsoever, but the spines feel like they might tear if you aren’t careful with them.
Those aside this is one of the best AOE deluxe figures out there. I highly reccomend it, 9/10 score.

agreed probably one of the best you will get of the AOE
I would also recommend Slug and Galvatron
ani-plamo:

macks-mechas:

Next review is Age of Extinction Deluxe Dinobot Scorn. This is probably one of the best deluxe figures available at the minute. There is very little fault to be found with it and it has an incredible amount of detail.
Firstly, something not mentioned in the instructions, the gunmetal / red side panels on the lower legs can expand outwards to give him thicker robot mode legs. It makes him look meaner and less skimpy.
The paint is applied nicely throughout the figure. The gunmetal, silver, orange and blue all work with the red and grey plastic well to make it look excellent. The figure is very good with poseability both in its Dinobot mode and robot mode, thus far it is the best of all the deluxe AOE figures I own.
The bad now; the neck joint is hindered by two tiny nibs on the back of the head. Unless you position it just right he is either looking straight up or straight down. I’m going to cut them away myself. Secondly this figure relies on rubber pieces for the spines. The tail is a much sturdier rubber that has no issues whatsoever, but the spines feel like they might tear if you aren’t careful with them.
Those aside this is one of the best AOE deluxe figures out there. I highly reccomend it, 9/10 score.

agreed probably one of the best you will get of the AOE
I would also recommend Slug and Galvatron
ani-plamo:

macks-mechas:

Next review is Age of Extinction Deluxe Dinobot Scorn. This is probably one of the best deluxe figures available at the minute. There is very little fault to be found with it and it has an incredible amount of detail.
Firstly, something not mentioned in the instructions, the gunmetal / red side panels on the lower legs can expand outwards to give him thicker robot mode legs. It makes him look meaner and less skimpy.
The paint is applied nicely throughout the figure. The gunmetal, silver, orange and blue all work with the red and grey plastic well to make it look excellent. The figure is very good with poseability both in its Dinobot mode and robot mode, thus far it is the best of all the deluxe AOE figures I own.
The bad now; the neck joint is hindered by two tiny nibs on the back of the head. Unless you position it just right he is either looking straight up or straight down. I’m going to cut them away myself. Secondly this figure relies on rubber pieces for the spines. The tail is a much sturdier rubber that has no issues whatsoever, but the spines feel like they might tear if you aren’t careful with them.
Those aside this is one of the best AOE deluxe figures out there. I highly reccomend it, 9/10 score.

agreed probably one of the best you will get of the AOE
I would also recommend Slug and Galvatron
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cityneonlights:

★ cityneonlights ★
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losttechnology:

Lime Bomb
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hankd:

Harpy by BioRays http://flic.kr/p/pJbmHQ
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ani-plamo:

1/100 MG Sazabi Ver. Ka Titanium
by ResidentEric

OoOoOooooO0o0
ani-plamo:

1/100 MG Sazabi Ver. Ka Titanium
by ResidentEric

OoOoOooooO0o0
ani-plamo:

1/100 MG Sazabi Ver. Ka Titanium
by ResidentEric

OoOoOooooO0o0
ani-plamo:

1/100 MG Sazabi Ver. Ka Titanium
by ResidentEric

OoOoOooooO0o0
ani-plamo:

1/100 MG Sazabi Ver. Ka Titanium
by ResidentEric

OoOoOooooO0o0
ani-plamo:

1/100 MG Sazabi Ver. Ka Titanium
by ResidentEric

OoOoOooooO0o0
ani-plamo:

1/100 MG Sazabi Ver. Ka Titanium
by ResidentEric

OoOoOooooO0o0
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scifi-fantasy-horror:

by HALIL URAL
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asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.